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MESSAGE ARCHIVE THEME

  • scienceisbeauty:

Spatially realistic cell modeling centers on realistic 3-D simulations of movements and reactions of molecules within and between cells. MCell, DReAMM and PSC_DX software is developed at the NRBSC and used to model and visualize events.
Source: Research Notes & Highlights, Projects in Scientific Computing, Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center

    scienceisbeauty:

    Spatially realistic cell modeling centers on realistic 3-D simulations of movements and reactions of molecules within and between cells. MCell, DReAMM and PSC_DX software is developed at the NRBSC and used to model and visualize events.

    Source: Research Notes & HighlightsProjects in Scientific ComputingPittsburgh Supercomputing Center

  • abstractnerd:
 Molecular model of Penicillin by Dorothy Hodgkin, c.1945. Front three quarter. Graduated grey background.

    abstractnerd:


    Molecular model of Penicillin by Dorothy Hodgkin, c.1945. Front three quarter. Graduated grey background.

  • from89:

    Glass Microbiology by Luke Jerram

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  • kqedscience:

New Bionic Hand Gives an Amputee a Grip — And a Sense of Touch
Science Translational Medicine
 

    kqedscience:

    New Bionic Hand Gives an Amputee a Grip — And a Sense of Touch

    Science Translational Medicine

     

    (via besidemoonlight)

  • collectivehistory:

Mr T G Phillips operates a lathe at a factory somewhere in Britain. He is producing artificial limbs and uses his own artificial arm to work the lathe, 1944. 
It is probable that this photograph was taken at Queen Mary’s Hospital, Roehampton, which is famous for the development of artificial limbs and for its work with the rehabilitation of amputees, which began in 1915 (IWM) 

    collectivehistory:

    Mr T G Phillips operates a lathe at a factory somewhere in Britain. He is producing artificial limbs and uses his own artificial arm to work the lathe, 1944. 

    It is probable that this photograph was taken at Queen Mary’s Hospital, Roehampton, which is famous for the development of artificial limbs and for its work with the rehabilitation of amputees, which began in 1915 (IWM

    (via themissroya)

  • cabbagingcove:

Demonstrating the use of a new model of prosthetic arm.
ca. 1950, Walter Reed Hospital

    cabbagingcove:

    Demonstrating the use of a new model of prosthetic arm.

    ca. 1950, Walter Reed Hospital

  • ca. 1850’s, [daguerreotype portrait of a druggist/chemist with his tools]
via the Daguerreian Society, Robert E. Haines Collection

    ca. 1850’s, [daguerreotype portrait of a druggist/chemist with his tools]

    via the Daguerreian Society, Robert E. Haines Collection

    (Source: tuesday-johnson, via antiquateddruggist)

  • Albert Renger-Patzsch. Untitled (Museum Folkwang), 1934.

    Albert Renger-Patzsch. Untitled (Museum Folkwang), 1934.

    (via jculbert)

  • The mechanical snake is one of several groundbreaking cancer technologies showcased at previous week’s International Conference on Oncological Engineering at the University of Leeds.

    The mechanical snake is one of several groundbreaking cancer technologies showcased at previous week’s International Conference on Oncological Engineering at the University of Leeds.

    (via neurosciencestuff)

  • molecularlifesciences:

erikkwakkel:

Thousands of Hi-Res pics free to use
A growing number of academic institutions are making their image databases available for general use under Creative Common licenses. The Wellcome Library is the latest addition to this lot. And what an addition it is! The London-based Wellcome Institute specializes in the history of public health and its library hosts a fantastic collection of books and other historic materials, spanning over a thousand years. Be like this flea and start jumping through their books by clicking here.
Pic: Micrographia, published in 1665 (Wellcome Library, EPB/C 29309/C). More about this item here. Read more about the Creative Commons move of the library here.

    molecularlifesciences:

    erikkwakkel:

    Thousands of Hi-Res pics free to use

    A growing number of academic institutions are making their image databases available for general use under Creative Common licenses. The Wellcome Library is the latest addition to this lot. And what an addition it is! The London-based Wellcome Institute specializes in the history of public health and its library hosts a fantastic collection of books and other historic materials, spanning over a thousand years. Be like this flea and start jumping through their books by clicking here.

    Pic: Micrographia, published in 1665 (Wellcome Library, EPB/C 29309/C). More about this item here. Read more about the Creative Commons move of the library here.

  • abystle:


The Frailty of Human Life, Salvator Rosa, 1656

Painted the same year his brother, son, nephews and nieces were all carried off by the plague that ravaged Naples.
In this piece, Fortuna, a young woman with flowers in her hair, sits on a glass sphere holding a baby. Though this appears to be a religious painting, with poses that echo a Madonna and Child, it is but a memento mori, laced with symbols of the brevity of life. Two putti blow bubbles and burn straw, both representing the ephemeral, and a winged skeleton guides the infant’s hand as he writes, “Conception, sinful; birth, a punishment; life, hard labour; death, inevitable.”

    abystle:

    The Frailty of Human Life, Salvator Rosa, 1656

    Painted the same year his brother, son, nephews and nieces were all carried off by the plague that ravaged Naples.

    In this piece, Fortuna, a young woman with flowers in her hair, sits on a glass sphere holding a baby. Though this appears to be a religious painting, with poses that echo a Madonna and Child, it is but a memento mori, laced with symbols of the brevity of life. Two putti blow bubbles and burn straw, both representing the ephemeral, and a winged skeleton guides the infant’s hand as he writes, “Conception, sinful; birth, a punishment; life, hard labour; death, inevitable.”

    Conception, sinful; birth, a punishment; life, hard labour; death, inevitable

  • 3inches:

The Cleveland Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health: Event Space Ceiling

    3inches:

    The Cleveland Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health: Event Space Ceiling

  • The four discoverers of anesthesia: Horace Wells, Crawford W. Long, Charles Jackson and William T. G. Morton. Original painting by Gregorio Calvi di Bergolo (1904-1994).

    The four discoverers of anesthesia: Horace Wells, Crawford W. Long, Charles Jackson and William T. G. Morton. Original painting by Gregorio Calvi di Bergolo (1904-1994).

  • catafalques:

Lindbergh-Carrel perfusion pump, c. 1935 
In 1930, Lindbergh’s sister-in-law developed a fatal heart condition. Lindbergh began to wonder why hearts could not be repaired with surgery. Starting in early 1931 at the Rockefeller Institute and continuing during his time living in France, Lindbergh studied the perfusion of organs outside the body with Nobel Prize-winning French surgeon Dr. Alexis Carrel. Although perfused organs were said to have survived surprisingly well, all showed progressive degenerative changes within a few days. Lindbergh’s invention, a glass perfusion pump, named the “Model T” pump, is credited with making future heart surgeries possible. However, in this early stage, the pump was far from perfected. In 1938, Lindbergh and Carrel summarized their work in their book, The Culture of Organs describing an artificial heart but it was decades before one was built. In later years, Lindbergh’s pump was further developed by others, eventually leading to the construction of the first heart-lung machine.

    catafalques:

    Lindbergh-Carrel perfusion pump, c. 1935 

    In 1930, Lindbergh’s sister-in-law developed a fatal heart condition. Lindbergh began to wonder why hearts could not be repaired with surgery. Starting in early 1931 at the Rockefeller Institute and continuing during his time living in France, Lindbergh studied the perfusion of organs outside the body with Nobel Prize-winning French surgeon Dr. Alexis Carrel. Although perfused organs were said to have survived surprisingly well, all showed progressive degenerative changes within a few days. Lindbergh’s invention, a glass perfusion pump, named the “Model T” pump, is credited with making future heart surgeries possible. However, in this early stage, the pump was far from perfected. In 1938, Lindbergh and Carrel summarized their work in their book, The Culture of Organs describing an artificial heart but it was decades before one was built. In later years, Lindbergh’s pump was further developed by others, eventually leading to the construction of the first heart-lung machine.

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